Attenuation of laboratory-induced stress in humans after acute administration of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm) (2003)

ory-induced psychological stress. Methods: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, balanced crossover experiment, 18 healthy volunteers received two separate single doses of a standardized M. officinalis extract (300 mg, 600 mg) and a placebo, on separate days separated by a 7-day washout period. Modulation of mood was assessed during predose and 1-hour postdose completions of a 20-minute version of the Defined Intensity Stressor Simulation (DISS) battery. Cognitive performance on the four concurrent tasks of the battery was also assessed. Results: The results showed that the 600-mg dose of Melissa ameliorated the negative mood effects of the DISS, with significantly increased self-ratings of calmness and reduced self-ratings of alertness. In addition, a significant increase in the speed of mathematical processing, with no reduction in accuracy, was observed after ingestion of the 300-mg dose. Conclusion: These results suggest that the potential for M. officinalis to mitigate the effects of stress deserves further investigation....

https://journals.lww.com/psychosomaticmedicine/Abstract/2004/07000/Attenuation_of_Laboratory_Induced_Stress_in_Humans.22.aspx

About Robert Zinn

Robert Zinn, M.D., Ph.D. is a medical doctor, physician, and web entrepreneur, who, for over 15 years was employed by academic and research institutions and focused his clinical practices on very specialized patient populations, such as those with rare genetic diseases or rare cancers. He shares his knowledge through his website, NutritionTheory.org

View all posts by Robert Zinn →